Jean Sibelius: Finlandia, Op. 26

Photo of Jean SibeliusFinlandia is a tone poem by the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius which was written in 1899 and revised in 1900.  Originally composed for the Press Celebrations of 1899 in protest against increasing censorship from the Czarist Russian Empire, it was the last of seven works performed to accompany a tableau depicting episodes from Finnish history.

In order to circumvent the Russian censorship of the time, Finlandia was often performed under alternative titles, such as Happy Feelings At The Awakening Of Finnish Spring and A Scandinavian Choral March.  Much of the work is taken up by rousing and turbulent music evoking the struggles of the Finnish people. However, toward the end, a calm comes over the orchestra, and the serenely melodic Finlandia Hymn is heard.  Although frequently cited as a Finnish folk melody, the Finlandia Hymn was essentially a work of Sibelius’ own creation.

JEAN SIBELIUS (1865-1957):  Finlandia, Op. 26.  Finlandia is a tone poem by the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius which was written in 1899 and revised in 1900.  Originally composed for the Press Celebrations of 1899 in protest against increasing censorship from the Czarist Russian Empire, it was the last of seven works performed to accompany a tableau depicting episodes from Finnish history.

In order to circumvent the Russian censorship of the time, Finlandia was often performed under alternative titles, such as Happy Feelings At The Awakening Of Finnish Spring and A Scandinavian Choral March.  Much of the work is taken up by rousing and turbulent music evoking the struggles of the Finnish people. However, toward the end, a calm comes over the orchestra, and the serenely melodic Finlandia Hymn is heard.  Although frequently cited as a Finnish folk melody, the Finlandia Hymn was essentially a work of Sibelius’ own creation.